An Anonymous Story

 

"My cousin is high on the autism scale. He was bullied mercifully and when ever I would hang out with him I would protect him. Being 6’4 he didn’t have a problem. I believe my mother was there. Like her I would rock to music and I had impulse control problems.

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Grade school was fine. I had my friends and obviously my symptoms weren’t a problem because we were all crazy kids back then.

Middle school sucked. I was bullied like crazy, taken advantage of. I met my only friend there which turned out to be the worst thing I could have done. I got into high school with him and drugs and alcohol took over.

I could function with the booze. I had no anxiety or awkwardness but I’ve done the stupidest things on it. I have a son who doesn’t even know me because of a one night stand I had while drunk.

I’m a convicted felon. Stuff I wouldn’t EVER do sober.

Fast forward to today, I realized that the bullying made me a better person. I have more empathy then most people. I know how it feels to be down and I would do anything to help.

But I believe it’s more of my autism. I’m too much of a people pleaser than anything."

--Anonymous

 

Bullying is never 'just having fun' or 'just joking around'. Bullying is long lasting, much more lasting than any bruise or scrape. I say this because it effects of being belittled and ostracized, stay with you. I literally think back to middle school, feeling insecure and gross. I mainly felt alone. I've always had a few but meaningful friends. I'm sure you're thinking that we ALL were all weird and awkward in our own way. And that is true. It's easy to pass it off and not think twice about it. Especially being on the other side of bullying. But for some this meant they dreading walking down the halls, or hating lunch time because they always sat at the end of the table by therselves, always avoiding the locker rooms and having to be exposed to people who make your life hell on the regular, or having people make fun of your clothes. Something a person truly has no control over. 

Kids taunt or point out anything different from themselves. I can say I've been on both sides of bullying. It's embarrassing to look back at now. Regardless of what it stems from it's always uncalled for to make someone feel small. Which is why it's so important to teach your children young to understand and accept those whose are different. Teach your children the beauty of standing out and lifting other's. Preach acceptance and inclusion. Every person deserves to feel welcome, accepted, and respected.